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Mutual Aid

Mutual Aid can be described as people with similiar experiences helping each other to manage and overcome issues - people coming together with their peers to build a network of support.

Some peoples journey to recovery takes them straight to mutual aid; whilst others are encouraged to attend groups through treatment providers or GP's. Either way, mutual aid groups offer a supportive environment that can really help people to recover, support long term help and give opportunities to support others.

There are many different types of mutual aid with different approaches. In Shropshire there are '12-step' fellowships such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous as well as SMART Recovery groups.

 

Mutual Aid

Mutual Aid

Mutual Aid can be described as people with similiar experiences helping each other to manage and overcome issues - people coming together with their peers to build a network of support.

Some peoples journey to recovery takes them straight to mutual aid; whilst others are encouraged to attend groups through treatment providers or GP's. Either way, mutual aid groups offer a supportive environment that can really help people to recover, support long term help and give opportunities to support others.

There are many different types of mutual aid with different approaches. In Shropshire there are '12-step' fellowships such as Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous as well as SMART Recovery groups.

shropshiremutualaidleaflet.pdf (pdf)
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If you would like further information, please consult the 'helpful links' section on this page.

Fact Zone


In 2011-12, 13,299 children and young people under the age of 18 in England accessed specialist services for problems with alcohol
Legal highs are far from harmless and can have similar risks to drugs like cocaine, ecstasy and speed. Risks include reduced inhibitions, drowsines, paranoid states, coma, seizures, and death.
The effects of illegal drugs are unpredictable. If mixed with alcohol the risks of harm are increased, which could result in anything from nausea to heart failure.
Alcohol with heroin is one of the most dangerous combinations. ‘Downers’ like heroin slow down your heart rate and breathing, combined with alcohol this doubles these effects putting you at risk of overdosing.
Alcohol and cocaine together increase the risk of heart attacks and fits and even sudden death. The two drugs mixed produce a highly toxic substance in your liver called cocaethylene.

 

Helpful Links