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After a review of all the scientific evidence, the Chief Medical Officer released new guidance about drinking alcohol in pregnancy.

As of January 2016 the guidance is that if you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, the safest approach is to avoid alcohol at all.

This is to help keep the risks to you and your baby to a minimum.

 

If you would like further information, please consult the 'helpful links' section on this page.

Fact Zone


Involving your child in being healthy can be challenging. Help them choose and prepare healthy meals and activities they enjoy, if it’s fun they are more likely to keep to a healthy lifestyle.
Night terrors in children can happen before the age of one, but they're most common between three and eight years old. Not usually a sign of any serious problems, most children eventually grow out of them. (http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/pages/sleep-problems-in-children.aspx#close)
Chickenpox incubates in the body for between 1-3 weeks, the most infectious time is 1-2 days before the rash appears and it continues to be infectious until all blisters have crusted over.
When light dims in the evening, we produce a hormone called Melatonin which tells our body to sleep. Bright lights, TV’s, mobile phones etc can disrupt this, particularly during puberty when lots of hormonal changes are happening.
If you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, the safest approach is to avoid alcohol altogether.  
Sleep is vital for premature babies and with hospitals being noisy places neonatal experts designed a tiny sleep monitor. The size of a domino, design was tricky, but it meant in one hospital the babies had a fifth more sleep.

 

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